Page 41 - Fringe Programme
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STROUD FRINGE 2017 41
INDEX: CORRIDOR
BY PAUL HARPER
EARLIER THIS YEAR, ON A LUXURIOUSLY WARM DAY I WAS STANDING IN THE PLEASANT COOL OF AN 18TH CENTURY BARN IN RURAL SLAD WEARING A VIRTUAL REALITY HEADSET THAT WOULD TRANSPORT ME TEMPORARILY TO AN ENTIRELY DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENT.
In this computer generated world I found myself feeling my way tentatively down a dim corridor. The crepuscular light
and the dark electronic soundscape, composed by Near Future (Neil Arthur from Blancmange and Bernholz), gave the experience a slightly ominous feeling that was an uncanny contrast to the actual setting. I was reminded of the disturbing, dream-like atmosphere of David Lynch’s Lost Highway. At intervals along the corridor there were doors leading off into virtual gallery spaces showing video works that described
a journey, or more accurately a richly ambiguous transition, between different spaces, blurring distinctions between urban and rural; industrial and pastoral; natural and synthetic. The beauty of
the images, mediated by this unfamiliar technology, shared an eerily dystopian quality. Having completed my virtual journey and removed my headset I
was again faced with an unsettling re- adjustment to a light- lled spring day and the sound of birdsong and convivial conversation. I had been immersed in the virtual world for no more than ten
minutes, but the sense of disjunction, of having been taken to another place, persisted over the next few hours.
This was the  rst public outing of corridor, a project created by Stroud- based INDEXprojects (run by artists Helen Kincaid, Joanna Greenhill and Ali Kayley) in collaboration with KARST, an artist-led contemporary artspace in
Plymouth and i-DAT, a digital research lab based at Plymouth University.
A pioneering virtual reality prototype, corridor uses technology that is
only just beginning to be used in contemporary art, and that may
be more familiar to players of sophisticated video games. Typically, INDEX have used the experience of developing corridor as an opportunity to re ect critically on the signi cance, the implications and the possibilities of virtual reality technologies for
the production and presentation of contemporary art.
For Stroud Fringe INDEX will be showing corridor, in a horse-box (!) situated outside the entrance to St. Laurence Church from 6-8pm on Friday and 4-7pm on Saturday and Sunday. The church itself looks set to be a lively hub for experimental music and  lm during the Fringe
and corridor will make an exciting contribution to the mix...


































































































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